CuiousPages - fiction and nonfiction
CuriousPages - fiction and nonfiction
Andrea Segovia was twenty eight and was not satisfied with the Spanish men in her home town of Madrid. She had recently discovered internet dating and met an English man called Craig Stemford. He lived in London and seemed to possess none of the flaws that Spanish men did. She was excited and could foresee no problems. They had chatted online for two months and six days and now Andrea was strolling through an arrivals lounge at Heathrow airport with her single suitcase in tow. She was beginning a new life and was travelling light.
Craig met her and took her to his house in Chepstow Villas. She told him how to greet her, how to sit, how to eat his meal in a satisfying way and how to drink tea properly. Andrea knew all about good taste. Her parents separated when she was a baby and she was raised by her mother who, by way of a divorce settlement, was left with two valuable possessions, an antique couch and a set of six antique soup bowls. These were the only material possessions she truly cherished. The other passion in her life was order and correctness. Andrea loved her mother and the two of them worked as a team in their household, correcting the placement of objects by a three-degree rotation to the left or a two-millimetre nudge to the right. But most care was taken on the display of those antique bowls along the living-room dresser and on meticulously brushing the couch so its fabric caught the light in a pleasing way. Andrea soon became as obsessed as her mother was with tidiness and by adulthood had developed a sixth sense for detecting bad taste. When she first entered Craig’s house she helpfully told him which of the pictures on his walls belonged in the dustbin, and after instructing him on his manners and habits, they were in bed and he began kissing her when she pushed him back and said: “No, you are doing it all wrong. You do not know how to kiss. Your mouth should not be so much open. Now, try again.”
She motioned for him to attempt the technique again and he obliged. She pushed him away and said, “No, that is still no good. Let me show you.”
She placed her fingers on his chin and closed his mouth, which was hanging open, then she began caressing his lips with hers, when his tongue attempted to part her lips. She pushed him back and said, “You will need lots of training. You are no good at this.”
Andrea’s first experience of kissing had set the standard for all others to match. At the age of sixteen she met Jorge. When they kissed it seemed to go on endlessly and transported her to another world and twelve years later she could still vividly recall the taste and texture of his mouth.
Six days after meeting Jorge, she took him to her mother’s house. Her mother was away and was not expected back for a few hours. Her mother’s rule was that the antique bowls were never to be used and food was not to be eaten in the living room, to protect the couch. But Andrea wanted to give Jorge something special and it seemed appropriate to break these two rules. She warmed some soup and served it in two of her mother’s antique bowls and, to complete Jorge’s treat, she decided they would eat while sitting on her mother’s couch. The two of them were about to sit and Andrea held out Jorge’s soup for him. At that moment, she heard her mother entering the house. She turned to look at the living-room door. She felt almost dizzy with pride, since her mother was about to meet Jorge. She thought he had taken the weight of the bowl from her and she released it. She felt a sensation beside her, as though a large well had opened up and black air were rushing down into it. She looked round to see the bowl landing on the couch, its soup emptying over the fabric and the bowl then falling to the tiled floor and smashing. Her mother entered the living-room and her eyes were drawn to the pool of soup soaking into her couch. She looked down to the smashed soup bowl and fainted.

Nonfiction

Secrets of the Hidden Vessels

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The book provides students or practitioners with an indispensible guide to properly understanding the Chinese medicine of the Nei Jing. And it also enables Chinese medicine to be explained to patients using terms they can understand. Read more>> 

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A fascinating read for anyone who’s interested in everyday communication and the related relationship problems. Read more>> 

Traditional Chinese Medicine

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Traditional Chinese Medicine

Traditional Chinese Medicine
Nonfiction. Articles and Essays on various aspects of Traditional Chinese Medicine, mainly focusing on acupuncture. Read more>> 

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